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Gary Guthman Trumpet Interview – The Other Side of the Bell #76

Gary Guthman – Trumpet Interview

Welcome to the show notes for Episode #76 of The Other Side of the Bell – A Trumpet Podcast. This episode features trumpeter Gary Guthman.

Listen to or download the episode below:

About Gary Guthman

Originally from Portland Oregon, Gary Guthman started his career at the age of nine. As a young teen, Gary was a member of the nationally acclaimed “Seldom Six” Dixieland Band, comprised of 12 to 14 years old who traveled the United States performing stage shows and conventions, playing, singing and tap-dancing all the way. Throughout Gary’s high school and college years, he performed with jazz and rock and roll bands and at 17 years old, auditioned for the acclaimed Portland (Oregon) Youth Orchestra; the oldest of its kind in the United States.

Gary played principal trumpet and in his last year with the PYO, performed as soloist with the orchestra, the only trumpet player in its history (to date) to achieve that acclaim. Mr. Guthman was fortunate to study trumpet for the first 15 of his playing years. His teachers were Jack Dalby, Joyce Johnson, James Smith and the recently retired (after 38 years!) Principal trumpet of the Oregon Symphony – Fred Sautter. After attending Portland State University, Gary was pleased to do short stints with the Dorsey Brothers Orchestra (lead by Lee Castle), Stan Kenton Orchestra, Don Ellis Orchestra and the Louis Bellson Orchestra. In the early 1980’s, Gary Guthman moved to Canada. Within the next few years, he became known as one of Canada’s premier lead and commercial trumpeters, playing on over 100, televised “ITV IN Concert” performances as well as numerous radio shows, jingles, movie sound tracks and in concert. Gary performed on television with Tom Jones, Paul Anka, directed the jazz program at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and formed his renowned “Tribute Orchestra”. 1995 saw the inception of Gary Guthman’s hit show “A Tribute to Harry James”, followed by the creation of his” Trumpet Greats” in 1998, “Swingmatism!” in 2004 and in 2007 for Internationally renowned harpist Małgorzata Zalewska, his critically acclaimed “Master and Margarita”. From 1998-2001, Gary was the Musical Director and starred in the North American Musical Theatre Revue “Forever Swing and won a distinguished Canadian “Jesse” Award.

In 2004, Gary debuted by personal invitation at Carnegie Hall with the New York Pops, conducted by Skitch Henderson.

Since moving to Central Europe, Gary has given hundreds of concerts with his “Gary Guthman Quartet” and “The New Swing Orchestra”, as well as Symphonic Pops concerts. In 2011, Gary released his next CD entitled “Solar Eclipse” on the Polski Radio Jazz Label, featuring his quartet of world-class Polish jazz artists Filip Wojciechowski/piano, Paweł Pańta/Bass, Cezary Konrad/Drums. Gary Guthman is the only non-Polish jazz artist to release his own CD in the 95-year history of Polish Radio. In 2014, along with his co-writer Doman Nowakowski, Gary composed the Libretto, Music and Lyrics for a new musical entitled “Letter from Warsaw”.

In 2015, Gary began an association as Producer and Composer for vocal star Sasha Strunin. Their first Cd project “Woman in Black” was completed in 2016 to critical acclaim in Poland. Her new Album – “Self-Portraits” features the compositions of Gary Guthman and the poetry of renowned Polish poet, Miron Białoszewski, was released in Warsaw on June 21, 2019.

Gary Guthman Links

Podcast Credits

David Rejano Trombone Interview – Trombone Corner #1

David Rejano – Trombone Interview

Welcome to the show notes for Episode #1 of the Trombone Corner. podcast This episode features principal trombone of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, David Rejano Cantero.

Listen to or download the episode below:

About David Rejano Cantero

David Rejano is the principal trombone of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra since 2016. Before that, he served as Principal Trombone with the Orquestra Sinfonica de Navarra from 2002 to 2007, Principal Trombone with the Orquestra del Gran Teatro del Liceo de Barcelona (Barcelona Opera House) from 2007 to 2010, and Principal Trombone with the Münchner Philharmoniker from 2010 to 2016.

He has also performed as a guest with the Berliner Philharmoniker, Orchestre National de France, Seoul Philharmonic, Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks or the Orchestre de l’Opéra de Paris.

David Rejano appears frequently as a soloist at the Festival Européen du Trombone, Concours National de Trombone de France, Sapporo Festival, Summer Brass Festival or the International Trombone Festival, as well as with top orchestras like the Vancouver Symphony or the LAPhil. He frequently works together with Zubin Mehta, Gustavo Dudamel and Valery Gergiev.

As a sought-after teacher, David gives regularly Masterclasses all over the world, including the Guildhall School of London (England), Conservatoire National Superieur de Paris (France), New England Conservatory, CSU Northridge, UCLA, USC, Colburn School, Montclair State University (USA), Münchner Musikhochschule (Germany), Landeskonservatorium Innsbruck (Austria), Barenboim-Said Academy (Spain) and the Beijing Central Conservatory of Music (China); as well as coaches youth orchestras as the National Youth Orchestra of Spain, Youth Orchestra of Central America (Guatemala), Youth Orchestra of Los Angeles (YOLA) and the Odeon Jugendorchester (Germany).

David Rejano Links

Podcast Credits

Tom Clary Trumpet Interview – The Other Side of the Bell #75

Tom Clary – Trumpet Interview

Welcome to the show notes for Episode #75 of The Other Side of the Bell – A Trumpet Podcast. This episode features trumpeter and founder of Clary Woodmutes, Tom Clary.

Listen to or download the episode below:

About Tom Clary

Tom Clary is a freelance trumpet-player/composer/arranger/woodworker/mute-maker and sometimes-attorney living in Memphis, Tennessee.  Tom was born in Northern Ireland, grew up in South Arkansas and moved to Memphis, Tennessee in 1989 to study Jazz Composition at Memphis State University.

In 1991, Tom won a NARAS Student Grammy for his composition “Ludicrous Dreams” and dropped out of school to pursue a music career, playing mostly in the house band at B.B. King’s Blues Club on Beale Street, freelancing, doing session work, working as an audio engineer, writing library music and horn arrangements, and writing show-music for marching band.

Tom eventually finished his music degree in 2002 and went on to complete a law degree at the University of Memphis in 2005. He practiced law full-time for approximately 13 years.  He still maintains a very-small law practice, but has returned to play and write music full-time, while making and selling trumpet mutes out of wood in his garage.

Tom Clary Links

Podcast Credits

Nathan Samuelson Trumpet Interview – The Other Side of the Bell #74

Nathan Samuelson – Trumpet Interview

Welcome to the show notes for Episode #74 of The Other Side of the Bell – A Trumpet Podcast. This episode features trumpeter Nathan Samuelson.

Listen to or download the episode below:

About Nathan Samuelson

If you ever have the opportunity to see Nathan Samuelson perform, prepare to be taken on a musical odyssey. His music is imbued with wanderlust —inspired by years at sea and a careful balancing act between new horizons and the love of home. Audiences are sonically teleported to the tropical shores of Brazil, the cosmopolitan streets of New York, and the old world sophistication of Europe. Despite the many nautical miles he’s logged, his music maintains the wholesome honesty of his prairie boyhood. That sweet earnestness and approachability is what turns audiences of strangers into loyal fans. 

The youngest son of an esteemed trumpet player and band teacher father, as well as a gentle and beloved flautist/pianist mother, Nathan seemed predestined to play since birth. His passion for trumpet became evident as a small boy, when upon listening to “Feel So Good” by Chuck Mangione he proclaimed that no matter the obstacle he would become a world class trumpet player. On his musical pilgrimage, he has studied under master teachers such as Dominic Spera [Indiana University], and Terell Stafford [Temple University -Philadelphia]. A devotee of Clifford Brown, he attends the Clifford Brown Trumpet Consortium each summer, receiving a full scholarship in 2018. 

Mentoring under international trumpeter and producer Gary Guthman, Nathan has developed a strong career as a guest entertainer on cruise ships. With a singing voice reminiscent of the crooners of yonder days, and the technical prowess and emotive ability on trumpet, Nathan brings a captivating and melodic sound to the stage. 

He has graced stages in exotic locales such as Brazil, Croatia, Italy, Greece, France, Portugal, England, Spain and more. To add, he shared these stages with world class artists like late soul icon Clem Curtis [The Foundations] of “Build Me Up, Buttercup” fame. He has also performed with Leanne Mitchell, winner of the first series of The Voice UK, and international soul singer, Lloyd Wade. In his home community of Edmonton, Alberta he is often found volunteering his talent for children and youth, as well as people living with disability. When not volunteering, he can be found performing as a guest artist on cruise ships, and performing with his own quintet at various jazz festivals and corporate events. 

After nearly twenty-two years of honing his craft and cultivating his passion, Nathan Samuelson launched his debut album City Lights Ahead [August 2018]. Inspired by his journey as a young man searching for love, for meaning, and for himself across the globe, City Lights Ahead is a brilliantly crafted, genre-bending love letter to the open sea, the close-knit family that uplifts him, and the starry embrace of the shore after a dark, stormy night.

Nathan Samuelson Links

Podcast Credits

Tom Hooten Trumpet Interview – The Other Side of the Bell #73

TOM HOOTEN – TRUMPET INTERVIEW

Tom Hooten - The Other Side of the Bell Podcast Logo

Welcome to the show notes for Episode #73 of The Other Side of the Bell – A Trumpet Podcast. This episode features trumpeter Tom Hooten.

Listen to the trumpet podcast right from your browser:

.Listen on Apple PodcastsListen on SpotifyListen on Google Podcasts

This podcast is brought to you by Bob Reeves Brass.

About Tom Hooten

Tom Hooten

Photo credit: Rob Shanahan

Thomas Hooten, Principal Trumpet of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, is one of the world’s most prominent classical trumpeters today. He can be heard on numerous recordings with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, and the National Brass Ensemble.

Hooten began his career in 2000 with a trumpet/cornet position in “The President’s Own” United States Marine Band in Washington, D.C., where he was often a featured soloist. He went on to join the Indianapolis Symphony as Assistant Principal Trumpet in 2004, the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra as Principal Trumpet in 2006, and the LA Philharmonic in 2012. He released Trumpet Call, his first solo album, in 2011. In 2019, he recorded John Williams’ Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra, which was conducted by the composer.

Thomas is an active soloist and has appeared with many groups, including the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, “The President’s Own” US Marine Band, United States Air Force Band, Fort Wayne Philharmonic, Richmond Symphony Orchestra, and Nagoya Philharmonic Orchestra. As an orchestral and chamber musician, he has performed with ensembles such as the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra, St. Louis Symphony, Grand Teton Music Festival, Harrisburg Symphony, and the Baltimore Symphony.  

Tom Hooten with trumpet

Photo credit: Rob Shanahan

Hooten is on the faculty at the University of Southern California where he and his wife, Jennifer Marotta, teach the trumpet studio. He is a passionate educator and offers workshops on career development, audition preparation, and the mental approach to performance. Thomas has given masterclasses and recitals at Juilliard, Northwestern University, Indiana University, Mannes School of Music, San Francisco Conservatory, Guildhall School of Music, and many other locations throughout the United States and the world. A native of Tampa, Florida, he earned his Bachelor of Music degree from the University of South Florida and his Master of Music degree from Rice University. His primary trumpet teachers have included Armando Ghitalla, John Hagstrom, and Don Owen.

Tom Hooten Trumpet Links

Trumpet Podcast Credits

Ralph Pyl Trumpet Interview – The Other Side of the Bell #72

Ralph Pyl – Trumpet Interview

Ralph Pyl Podcast Logo

Welcome to the show notes for Episode #72 of The Other Side of the Bell – A Trumpet Podcast. This episode features trumpeter Ralph Pyl.

Listen to the trumpet podcast right from your browser:

LListen on Apple PodcastsListen on SpotifyListen on Google Podcasts

This podcast is brought to you by Bob Reeves Brass.

About Ralph Pyl

Ralph Pyl commenced trumpet at age 12 on the northern beaches of Sydney Australia beginning his career studying and learning with US trumpet players and mentors John Hoffman and Dick Montz. In 1982 Ralph received a scholarship to study under the direction of Don Burrows at the NSW State Conservatorium of Music and at the age of 18 began a professional career with 3 years of touring with Australia’s renowned Daly Wilson Big Band.

Ralph has performed and recorded with many artists both in Australia and overseas including International stars K.C and the Sunshine Band, Boy George and Culture Club, Shirley Bassey, Ronnie Corbett, The Four Tops, The Temptations, Ralph Carmichael, Buddy Greco, The Platters, Sir George Martin, Tom Jones, Bernadette Peters, Michael Crawford, Wayne Newton, Louie Bellson, Bobby Shew, Joe Williams, Al Jarreau, Tim Rice, Harry Connick Jnr, Glenn Close, Michael Ball, Michael Buble, Lorna Luft, Wayne Bergeron, Jerry Lewis, Michael Feinstein, Frankie Valli, Leo Sayer, Il Divo, Megan Hilty, The Glenn Miller Orchestra and Australian National stars James Morrison, Grace Knight, Don Burrows, Anthony Warlow, Marcia Hines, Frank Bennett, Tommy Tycho, Rhonda Burchmore, Marina Prior, Emma Pask, Silverchair, John Foreman, The Black Sorrows and since 1998 has been lead trumpet with Tom Burlinson’s “Frank – The Sinatra Story in Song”. This show has now been widely regarded as one of Australia’s best ever touring productions. For the 2002, 2003 and 2004 Sydney Festivals, Ralph also assembled an Australian All Star Jazz Orchestra for World renowned US composers and arrangers Maria Schneider, Bob Florence and Rob McConnell from the Boss Brass.

Ralph’s credits have also seen him playing in several stage and theatre productions including 42nd Street, Hot Shoe Shuffle, Porgy and Bess, A Chorus Line, Beauty and the Beast, Guys and Dolls, Cats and Fame just to mention a few. He has also appeared on over 150 albums for vocalists, various bands and numerous Australian and International motion picture sound tracks and TV commercials.

Up until 1998 Ralph had been a member of the Channel Nine Midday Show Band with Geoff Harvey and hosts Ray Martin, Derryn Hinch and Kerri-Anne Kennerley. Other TV show bands include playing with the John Foreman Orchestra on Australian Idol for 7 years.

In June 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005 the “Sydney All Star Big Band” were the winners of the 27th, 28th, 29th and 30th Australian Mo Award for best jazz ensemble of the year.

Ralph is currently working in Sydney and interstate as a freelance trumpet player involved in a number of different projects. He fronts his own bands the “Sydney All Star Big Band”, “Back to Back” and regularly features in a number of James Morrison’s bands.

Ralph Pyl Trumpet Links

Trumpet Podcast Credits

9 TRUMPET TIPS TO TAKE YOUR PLAYING TO THE NEXT LEVEL IN 2020

We’re already a few weeks in to 2020 and, if you’re like me, you’ve already dropped some of your New Year’s resolutions. But that’s OK. There’s no reason to wait until next year to jump back on that horse and start going forward again. Here are some tips I’ve put together that will help your trumpet playing this year. The goal here is not to try to do the entire list, in fact, not every tip may pertain to you. Just pick a few to work on and you’ll soon be reaping the benefits in your playing, and having more fun as well. So, let’s get going:

1. Restarts are Okay!

Maybe it’s human nature, or maybe it’s just a trumpet player thing, but whenever I take a day or two off from playing I know the next day will be rough. And guess what? It usually was…until I discovered how strongly my thinking controlled the outcome of my practicing.  Over the holidays when I had a few days off from playing I decided I would only think positively about the break. It would be a fresh start. It would allow me to refocus my energy on what I do well and unlearn some bad habits. Trumpet playing would be easier and effortless this time, not foreign, forced, and strident. The results were astounding. I made breakthroughs in my playing that I had been working on for months and even years. What’s even more amazing is that this happened after a break from playing when I would have thought the exact opposite would have happened — I should have regressed in my playing. Whether you are just getting back to it again after the winter holidays or are laid up with the flu, remember that restarts are okay with a positive mental approach.

2. Back to Fundamentals.

Spend some time this year going back to fundamentals (especially if you are following tip #1). I’m not talking about daily maintenance. I’m talking about going back to page 1. Spend time working on your sound production, your attack, and your breathing. Imagine if you could become 10% more efficient (creating more sound for less work), or be 10% more relaxed while you play? These improvements can only be made by playing fundamentals.
Taking a beautiful Martin Committee apart to clean.
Taking a beautiful Martin Committee apart to clean.

3. Clean Your Trumpet & Mouthpiece.

This tip should be #1 and it will apply to probably 95% of you based on the horns we see here at the shop. Take 30 minutes of your week and give your horn a good bath. If you can’t do that, take it to a repair shop to have it acid washed or ultra-sounded. Trumpet is hard enough to play consistently day-to-day. When the gunk inside your horn is constantly building up you are spending at least part of your practice time adjusting to it. Get rid of this variable by getting your horn back to the way it should play and maintain it by flushing it out every week. You can also keep a lot of stuff from building up in your horn by using a leadpipe swab after every practice session.

4. Have Fun!

The trumpet is a demanding, unforgiving instrument. If you are a professional trumpet player, the music industry is the same. Whether you are an amateur or a professional, don’t lose sight of the fact that trumpet playing is fun. Don’t focus on the inept conductor or the drummer who adds an extra beat to the measure with every drum fill. When these or similar thoughts enter your mind, take a slow, deep breath and then smile. Focus instead on how the thrill of playing a musical instrument for others, and being able to share your talent, is something that just a small percentage of people in the world are privilege to do. And, you’re one of those lucky few!

5. Take a Lesson.

Our most precious commodity is time. A good teacher is worth their weight in gold because they can improve your playing in less time than you could on your own. Yes, there is a wealth of free information on the Internet on how to play the trumpet; however, you’ll spend more precious time searching, filtering out bad information, and grazing than if you had a guide to show you along the path. One of my trumpet teachers still takes lessons himself every month. He’ll call up other teachers in the area (many of whom are his colleagues) to take a lesson. He also gets together with out-of-town players who are in the area on tour for lessons. This allows him to always expand his knowledge, improve his playing, and expand his bag of tricks to use for his own students.

6. Get Together With Others

Get together and practice with someone else. This may be playing duets, or you can go through your daily routine and trade off. There are plenty of benefits to this. First, you’ll have more fun than just sitting alone in your practice room like you would be normally doing. Second, you benefit more because you can share experiences, learn from the other person, and you can teach them as well. And third, you tend to have a better practice pace when you work with someone else because you take breathers to talk, laugh, or listen to each other.

7. Set Goals

The start of a New Year is always a good time to set new goals or reevaluate your existing ones. If you don’t have goals for your trumpet playing, start setting them! They may be long-term or short-term. I recommend a combination of both. I set goals for every practice session, jotting them down before I start playing. It may be a tempo I want to hit on a fingering or tonguing exercise, or a difficult passage I want to make easier. Longer term goals should be written down as well. For some reason, writing them down tends to put them in motion better than just thinking about them. It may be a career goal, like playing in the Chicago Symphony. It may be tackling a challenging piece you’ve always wanted to play. It may be getting the nerves up to play in front of a group for the first time. Whatever your goal is, write it down and start heading towards it.
Listen!
Image courtesy of imagerymajestic / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

8. Listen, listen, listen!

I find myself overwhelmed with things in my day that take up my time – work, family, Facebook, sleep, driving. I realized that listening to music has become a much less significant part of my day than it used to. I don’t remember the last time I listened to a Mahler Symphony or Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue from beginning to end without distractions. If you are like me, take a concerted effort this year to make the time to listen. We gain so much from listening to great music that cannot be achieved in the practice room. Hearing great musicians and absorbing different styles of music through listening translates directly into improvements in your own musicianship. Besides, hearing a live concert can be so inspiring that you’ll be reminded of why we do what we do!
ID-10030130
Image courtesy of Apple’s Eyes Studio/freedigitalphotos.net

9. Perform!

Make it a point to get out and perform for people. No matter what your level of progress is, once you know 4-5 notes on the trumpet you can make music. You have the tools to connect emotionally with your audience. I’ve seen beginning band students who have been playing for less than a year make people smile and cry with the songs they play. You don’t have to perform at a symphony hall to move people. Play in church, search out a community band, or play at a local nursing home. When you start connecting with others through your playing, you’ll be inspired to do more, and have a sense of fulfillment that you don’t get from just practicing. The thrill of playing a musical instrument for others and being able to share your talent is something that just a small percentage of people in the world are privileged to do. What tips do you have? If you have your own tips I hope you’ll share them in the comments section below.

Reinhold Friedrich Trumpet Interview – The Other Side of the Bell #71

Reinhold Friedrich – Trumpet Interview

Reinhold Friedrich Podcast Logo

Welcome to the show notes for Episode #71 of The Other Side of the Bell – A Trumpet Podcast. This episode features trumpeter Reinhold Friedrich.

Listen to or download the episode below:

About Reinhold Friedrich

Reinhold Friedrich

Born in Weingarten / Baden, Reinhold Friedrich has been a guest of all major stages around the world since his success at the ARD International Music Competition in 1986. Strongly influenced by his teachers Edward H. Tarr (Schola Cantorum Basiliensis, Basel) and Pierre Thibaud (Conservatoire Superieure de Musique Paris). He has always considered that old and new music belong together. The re-discovery of forgotten works of the Romantic period and the classical modern era lie particularly close to his heart, as does his interest in avant- garde music.

He gave his debut performance at the Berliner Festwochen with “Sequenza X” by Luciano Berio. This was followed by his first appearance as a soloist at the Musikverein in Vienna with the Vienna Academy under Martin Haselböck, playing the trumpet concerto by Joseph Haydn on the historic keyed trumpet. His involvement with historical performance practice has brought him together with a variety of orchestras such as the Orchestre des Champs-Elysees, La Stagione Frankfurt, Kammerorchester Basel, L’arte del mondo, Concerto Melante, the Berliner Barock Solisten as well as the Cappella Andrea Barca under Sir András Schiff. The focus of this collaboration was often on the 2nd Brandenburg Concerto by J.S. Bach, whose rendering is near and dear to Friedrich.

As part of his engagement with contemporary compositions, Reinhold Friedrich premiered a large number of significant works. This includes pieces by Wolfgang Rihm, Carola Bauckholt, Luciano Berio, Edison Denissov, Peter Eötvös, Hans Werner Henze, Adriana Hölszky, Nicolaus A. Huber, Luca Lombardi, Benedict Mason, Sir Peter Maxwell Davis, Hilda Parèdes, Matthias Pintscher, Jan Rääts, Rebecca Saunders, Nina Šenk, EnjottSchneider, Daniel Schnyder, Gerhard Stäbler, Eino Tamberg, Caspar Johannes Walter, Christian Wolff, and Benjamin Yusopov. Solo concerts such as “Eirene” by Herbert Willi (Wergo) and “Nobody knows de trouble I see” by Bernd Alois Zimmermann, whose CD recording won an ECHO Klassik in 1994, form an important part of his broad repertoire.

As a soloist, Reinhold Friedrich performed with ensembles such as the Bamberger and Wiener Symphoniker, the Staatsoper Berlin and Stuttgart, the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, the Frankfurt Museum Orchester, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, the BBC Symphony Orchestra, the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra Prague, the orchestra of the Teatro Colon, Buenos Aires and all German radio symphony orchestras; conducted amongst others by Semyon Bychkov, Dennis Russell Davies, Peter Eötvös, Vladimir Fedevichev, Adam Fischer, Michael Gielen, Philippe Herreweghe, Christopher Hogwood, Manfred Honeck, Eliahu Inbal, Krystjan and Neeme Järvi, Dmitri Kitaenko, Sir Neville Marriner, Ingo Metzmacher, Andris Nelsons, Jonathan Nott, Kazushi Ono, Matthias Pintscher, Trevor Pinnock, Stanislav Skrowaczewski, and Hans Zender.

From 1983 to 1999 Reinhold Friedrich held the position of solo trumpeter at the Radio Sinfonieorchester Frankfurt. In 2003, Claudio Abbado appointed him permanent solo trumpeter of the Lucerne Festival Orchestra, which has been conducted by Riccardo Chailly since 2017. Furthermore, Reinhold Friedrich is the Artistic Director of the Lucerne Festival Orchestra Brass Ensemble. Present chamber music partners of Reinhold Friedrich are Thomas Duis, Bernd Glemser, and Eriko Takezawa (piano), Robyn Schulkowsky (percussion), Iveta Apkalna, Sebastian Küchler-Blessing, Martin Lücker, and Christian Schmitt (organ).

Reinhold Friedrich is a professor of trumpet at Karlsruhe University of Music, a sought-after lecturer for master classes, and honorary professor at the Royal Academy of Music in London, Escuela Superior de Musica REINA SOFIA in Madrid, and as well as in Hiroshima / Japan. His former students are winners in almost all major international competitions and hold leading positions or professorships throughout Europe, Tokyo, Tel Aviv, Moscow, and Rio de Janeiro.

Reinhold Friedrich was awarded another ECHO Klassik for the recording of the “Russian Trumpet Concerts” (MDG) with Göttinger Symphony Orchestra conducted by Christoph-Mathias Mueller. Numerous other CD recordings document his multifaceted work, including the first recording of the trumpet concerto “Pieta” by Christian Jost (Coviello) and the recording of the second Brandenburg Concerto (Sony) with the Berlin Baroque Soloists under Reinhard Goebel, which won the OPUS Classical price of 2018. A recording of Stravinsky’s L’histoire du Soldat (with Isabelle Faust) at the Wigmore Hall London is in the planning stage.

Upcoming concerts will lead him to the Elbphilharmonie (concert by Bernd Alois Zimmermann), to the Osaka Century Symphony Orchestra, and the Hiroshima Symphony Orchestra (concert by Toshio Hosokawa), to Siberia (UA “Spirit of Siberia” by Enjott Schneider), to the National Orchestra Yerevan (concert by Ilya Chakov), to Australia with Wolfgang Rihm’s trumpet concert “Marsyas” and to the Lucerne Academy Orchestra under the direction of George Benjamin, with Nuria Rial to the Handel Festival in Halle and with the Berliner Barock Solisten under Reinhold Goebel to Lutry and Versailles. He will also be performing in Katowice, Warsaw, Wroclaw, Geneva, Groningen, Hamburg, Bremen, Freiburg, Dusseldorf, Nuremberg, Lyon, Armenia, Korea and Taiwan.

Reinhold Friedrich Links

Podcast Credits

Greg Adams Trumpet Interview – The Other Side of the Bell #70

Greg Adams – Trumpet Interview

Greg Adams Podcast Logo

Welcome to the show notes for Episode #70 of The Other Side of the Bell – A Trumpet Podcast. This episode features trumpeter Greg Adams.

Listen to or download the episode below:

About Greg Adams

Greg Adams holding trumpetThe sound of Grammy and Emmy nominated trumpeter, arranger Greg Adams is one of the world’s best-known musical signatures. As a founding member of Tower of Power, legendary for his arrangements that made the TOP horn section a sought out entity all its own. With countless collaborations in the studio and live on stage, Adams has made his mark on a broad stretch of today’s musical landscape that includes jazz, pop, rock, R&B, soul, and funk.

It has been nearly a quarter century since the genre chameleon trumpeter and arranger became a leader in his own right with his ground breaking 1995 debut Hidden Agenda went. all the way to #1 on Billboard and stayed there for 5 weeks. He hasn’t looked back since.  With Greg Adams’ approach that music is a language… the CONVERSATION continues. You will sense a direct connection with the live feel of the music, the open breath of each note and the collaboration of each player.

East Bay Soul celebrating their 10th Anniversay this year is the next creative step forward in a career filled with magic moments spanning over four decades, including an International Broadcasting Award from The Hollywood Radio and Television Society. An enduring recording artist and performer, the charismatic trumpeter has earned the respect of his peers and fans alike worldwide.

Greg has lent his sound to Elton John, Rod Stewart, Santana, Phish, Celine Dion, Luther Vandross, Madonna, The Rolling Stones. Bonnie Raitt, Paul Shaffer, Little Feat, Billy Preston, Peter Frampton, Chicago, The Eurhythmics, Lyle Lovett, Heart, Linda Ronstadt, Aaron Neville, The Brothers Johnson, Wilson Pickett, Huey Lewis and the News, Raphael Saadiq, Al Green, Quincy Jones, B.B. King, Ray Charles, Terrence Trent Darby, Dionne Warrick and Josh Groban to name a very few.

Greg has played on over 900 hundred recordings. Beginning early with Elton John’s “The Bitch Is Back” Chaka Kahn’s “Fool’s Paradise” Little Feat’s “High Roller” and Heart’s “Tell It like It Is”. You’ve heard Greg’s collaboration with Paul Shaffer on the opening theme of Late Show With David Letterman and on score arrangements in films as, Duets, Mask, Top Gun, Saving Silverman, and Austin Powers In Goldmember with Smashmouth. Teaming up with Stanley Clarke on Little Big League and on Sgt. Peppers Lonely Heart Club Band with the illustrious George Martin.

Underneath the Mistletoe marks Greg Adams and East Bay Soul’s 5th studio album and their first Christmas CD as they celebrate their 10thAnniversary. Here, East Bay Soul performs classic Christmas Songs with a mix of Funk Jazz, R&B and Soul. Greg Adams, Grammy and Emmy nominated trumpeter’s gorgeous arrangements herald in the season and the soulful R&B vocal by Darryl Walker caress the timeless lyrics of your favorite holiday music.

Greg Adams Links

Podcast Credits

DEVELOPING TRUMPET PRACTICE PRIORITIES AND WORKING WITH YOUR EQUIPMENT BY ROY POPER

I am continually grateful for the care and attention that was paid me by my teachers in the areas of foundation, mechanics, technique and musical perspective. Where equipment was concerned they made it clear that the sound must be heard first in my mind, that I must solidify my musical ideas with strong repeatable skills, and that only as those skills gained in strength would good equipment become more and more meaningful. The message they gave to me is the same one I give to my students: In order to get the most out of your practice time you need to prioritize your practice categories. After you have developed efficient and appropriate practice habits you can then look for optimal equipment. Although the beauty of a trumpet sound, along with its power and brilliant color is what we initially fall in love with, it is our foundation on the instrument that provides the superstructure upon which we build our mechanics and technique. The foundation of our playing is developed and perfected on a daily basis. It is often called the “warm-up” and usually includes mouthpiece work, lip slurs, scales, rapid articulation studies, double- and triple-tongue drills, and lip flexibility studies. My own foundation practice is a combination of selected exercises from the Max Schlossberg book (“Daily Drills and Technical Studies for the Trumpet”) and the James Stamp exercises from the book “Warmups Plus Studies”. I believe that these two books are the most important books of foundational studies for all players, regardless of the musical genre (classical, jazz, commercial, etc.) in which one performs. My advice to a developing player is to choose a teacher that teaches a strong foundation as the basis for subsequent technical and artistic achievement. Good mechanics are built upon the foundation that we put into place for ourselves on a daily basis. The terms “mechanics” and “technique” are often used almost interchangeably, though I believe that is a mistake. They are two very different things. Proper mechanics create ease of production. Ease of production then supports consistent facile technique. Therefore, good technique is a result of correct mechanics. As an example, if I execute a passage with fast finger technique well on an occasional basis, it means that I am capable of mastering physical speed against a metronome. It does not mean that my finger rhythm is even or that the sound is beautiful, or that I will always be able to produce that technique on demand. Good mechanics will promote a facile and reliable technique, but executing feats of fast technique does not necessarily promote good mechanics. Musical perspective is the “total picture” that results from combining intuitive and learned musical knowledge. It is the total of what we know expressed in sound. One’s musical perspective is most effectively expressed when one’s foundation, mechanics, and technique are in good working order. Oftentimes, a player’s musical perspective is more developed than his or her mechanics or technique. This is fine because it is still possible to achieve an excellent musical result at each technical and mechanical level. A strong foundation, a high level of mechanical skill, and a strong technique coupled with well-developed musical perspective will produce a superior and clearer sound picture every time. Practice time therefore, should be devoted to each of these aspects on an on-going and consistent basis. A few words about equipment: I believe strongly in the value of the after-market valve alignment. When the valves are aligned properly the “bugles” in each combination become unified in color and timbre and instrument will then blow evenly. The horn is then optimized and will play as it was meant to play. I prefer the Bob Reeves valve alignment and have been depending on it for over 20 years. It never ceases to amaze me how happy my students are with their trumpets after they have invested in a valve alignment. The current-day valve alignment is one of the significant advances in trumpet technology because in optimizing the instrument it promotes correct trumpet mechanics by encouraging players to blow straight through the trumpet instead of “tipping” the air in the direction that the pitches are moving. If after a valve alignment the instrument is still unsatisfactory, instead of immediately running out and buying a new mouthpiece you should first examine the resistance created by the relationship between the mouthpiece and the mouthpiece receiver. If your mouthpiece fits in the mouthpiece receiver too far or not far enough its resistance may be wrong for you. Your mouthpiece might need to penetrate the receiver a little more, or be pulled back a little in order to discover a more favorable resistance. If this produces the sound and ease of blowing that you prefer then purchasing a new mouthpiece is unnecessary. If you still find the sound and/or the “blow” lacking you may wish to buy a new mouthpiece and repeat the fitting procedure. My last point is about trumpet mouthpieces. We are in a golden age of choice where mouthpieces are concerned: there are many fine manufacturers producing excellent models from which to choose. Try everything you want to try. When you hear what you like buy it, have it fitted properly to your instrument, and begin to work with it. Bear in mind that when you first try a mouthpiece and find it attractive, you are just getting a glimpse into what it can be and can do for you. Your facial muscles will not immediately be accustomed to the new position appropriate to the new mouthpiece. Consequently, the mouthpiece might play nicely for you for a week or less, and then begin to give you trouble by making you tire quickly, making your tone airy, marginalizing your range and so on. If you work with it, play scales on it, articulate on it, practice your lip-slurs, all the while practicing carefully and correctly, in about four weeks the mouthpiece will begin to give back to you what you first found attractive about it and you will enjoy its benefits. This article is aimed at high school and college students in the hope that they may gain a little perspective about what they have ahead of them in studying trumpet. Practice “smart”, get a good teacher and good information about your equipment, and you will enjoy the learning process more and make greater strides in achieving your technical and artistic goals.

About Roy Poper

Roy Poper has for more than 30 years maintained an active performing career of a breadth rare among musicians. His engagements span every facet of trumpet performance including symphonic principal player (Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and L.A. Opera), film studio work (over 500 major motion pictures), chamber music (founding member, The Modern Brass Quintet), and “popular” genres including jazz ensembles, Broadway shows, and even recordings with Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention. Equally respected as a teacher, he was for more than 20 years a member of the faculty of the University of Southern California School of Music prior to moving to Oberlin, OH in 2002 to assume the duties of Associate Professor of Trumpet at the Oberlin Conservatory. His book, Roy Poper’s Guide to the Brasswind Methods of James Stamp (Balquhidder Music), which serves as a companion to James Stamp Warm-ups and Studies (Editions BIM) has become an acclaimed addition to the trumpet method-book literature, thoroughly explaining how to execute and effeciently utilize James Stamps’ teaching methods. He continues to be in demand as a performer, performing frequently in the greater Cleveland Area and Los Angeles. He has commissioned numerous works, some of which appear on his forthcoming CD, L.A. Trumpet Works. Roy has been recorded on the Crystal, Orion, Nonesuch, and Dorian labels.

Dontae Winslow Trumpet Interview – The Other Side of the Bell #69

Dontae Winslow – Trumpet Interview

Welcome to the show notes for Episode #69 of The Other Side of the Bell – A Trumpet Podcast. This episode features trumpeter Dontae Winslow.

Listen to or download the episode below:

About Dontae Winslow

Dontae Winslow is one of the most versatile in-demand trumpeter/arranger/composers on the Hollywood music scene. His trumpet/arranging/songwriting can be heard on classics such as Kanye West’s grammy winning “We Major” from the multi-platinum Late Registration, Jayz’s “I Made it”, Dr. Dre’s Compton Movie Soundtrack (where Dontae composed the iconic fanfare intro and played solos throughout the album). The Final track “Talking to My Diary” uses a 2minute jazz trumpet solo after Dre’s verse over a hiphop song which was Dontae’s 1st take. He also plays on Kendrick Lamar’s “County Building Blues”, Snoop Dog’s Ego Trippin, Aloe Blacc’s smash song “I’m the Man”, and Beyonce’s Huge Ego among countless other hits. He has toured in the band of Justin Timberlake since 2013 where he performs in the Netflix Movie “JT & The Tennessee Kids. Dontae has performed in front of millions in the 2020 Experience World tour, Legends of Summer World Tour, and Man of The Woods World Tour. He has alo been on the bands of Lady Antebellum (You Look Good), D’angelo (Vodoo), Kamasi Washington, Raphael Saadiq, Lauryn Hill, Jill Scott, and most recently has been the arranger, orchestrator, and Music director for Queen Latifah.

Dontae has played trumpet on countless TV shows such as the Soul Train Awards, BET Awards, HipHop Awards, MTV Awards, BET HONORS, the NAACP Image Awards, Jimmy Kimmel, Jimmy Fallon, SNL, Trumpet Awards, McDonalds 365 Awards, American Idol, The Voice, The Masked Singer, and The Four. His first scoring stage session was for “Mall of America” by composer Jacob Yoffee for the largest inside mall ride in America with Trumpeters Jon Lewis and Tom Hooten. His jazz trumpet playing can be heard on the new release by Kamasi Washington called “Heaven and Earth”.

Dontae has over 10 artist albums on his indy label Winslowdynasty among them are: Dontae Winslow “Ballads” feat Roy Hargrove, Dontae Winslow “EnterThe Dynasty” feat Questlove, Dennis Chambers, Brian Frasier-Moore, Adam Blackstone, and Chick Corea, Winslowdynasty “The Life Album” feat his wife Mashica, and Change a Life Change The World his award winning kids album.

After touring with JT Dontae released a summer party anthem sure to get you moving entitled “Shit Yeah” with him producing the TNkids live band along with analog synths and sing rapping the verse/choruses.

His new work “Trumpet And A Mic”, available everywhere, is a short film he directed, orchestrated, and composed music for about his life and overcoming obstacles while turning pain into redemptive power through faith.

Dontae started trumpet at age 10 but due to bad public school teachers had many embouchure changes in middle and high school and a hard start at getting the trumpet to work Good physically for him. He formed his interest in the middle band of a sax player Richard Burns and learned to play by ear. In high school

His first private lessons were with Jari Villanueva, then continued trumpet and learned to read music from Carolyn Foulkes in high school. At The New School Dontae studied with Roy Hargrove who would become a life musical mentor until his passing. In college at the Peabody Conservatory of the Johns Hopkins University Dontae studied with Wayne Cameron for undergrad, and Langston Fitzgerald III for graduate in classical trumpet performance. He has always had great jazz lessons from Maryland based jazz giant trumpeter Tom Williams and has been mentored by Jon Faddis and Wallace Roney. As a recipient of the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Fellowship at USC Dontae studied jazz trumpet, composition, and film scoring with jazz legend trumpeter/composer Terence Blanchard. Also at USC he studied with jazz legend Bobby Shew, string arranger Jeremy Lubbock, Studio trumpet legend Gary Grant, and Gospel Composer Margaret Douroux.

Dontae has composed music for the feature films : “In The Hive” by director Robert Townsend starring Oscar Award winner Michael Clarke Duncan, and Loretta Divine, The New Edition Story for BET by director Chris Robinson. In 2019 Esquire magazine recently voted “Baltimore Rising “ HBO’s documentary about the riots in Baltimore, directed by Sonja Sohn, one of the Top Documentaries of All-Time. “Baltimore Rising” explored the tragic death of Freddie Gray by Police and a broken justice system. The film used Dontae’s talent as film composer, Trailer composer, and End Song title songwriter and Music Producer which is rare for this industry.

Dontae arranged string orchestra for Eminem’s Coachella performance with Dr.Dre in 2017. He also arranged live string arrangements for Eminem’s MTV EURO’s premiere of “Walk On Water” as well as his SNL performance of Walk on Water, Stan, and Love The Way You Lie.

Dontae arranged “Suit N Tie” with full 300 piece marching band for Justin Timberlake in his Superbowl 52 performance. In an epic performance in 2019 Dontae arranged strings for Mary J. Blige’s lifetime achievement award on BET. He has been awarded the John Lennon International songwriting contest for winner Children’s music. Recently Dontae composed the music for Michelle Obama’s “Note To Self” on CBS by Gayle King.

Dontae has produced songs for platinum artists Snoop, Dr. Dre, Avant, Mary Mary, and Keyshia Cole. As an arranger he has orchestrated/arranged and played trumpet in the show for Queen Latifah’s debut concert with the Boston Pops, and recently their 2019 Fourth of July Summer Holiday Concert series. Dontae is influenced by all styles of music especially European classical composers Shostakovich, Mahler, Stravinsky, Rachmaninoff and Chopin. In his playing you can hear his love for the soul and swag of Lee Morgan, the harmony of Woody Shaw, the pathos of Roy Hargrove, and the elegance of Miles Davis.

He designed his own custom trumpet the “Winslowdynasty Model” DWA6 model by Adams Instruments with Miel Adams and was featured on their international magazine cover.

In addition Dontae is a jazz improvisation, music production, film composing and performance clinician for such esteemed institutions as The Berklee School of Music, The Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz, The Los Angeles Unified School District, and The Peabody Conservatory of The Johns Hopkins University.

Dontae is family man who has been married to his wife, artist/songwriter/singer Mashica Winslow for 20 blissful Years and they have two amazing kids.

Dontae Winslow Links

Podcast Credits

Niall O’Sullivan Trumpet Interview – The Other Side of the Bell #68

Niall O’Sullivan – Trumpet Interview

Welcome to the show notes for Episode #68 of The Other Side of the Bell – A Trumpet Podcast. This episode features trumpeter Niall O’Sullivan.

Listen to or download the episode below:

About Niall O’Sullivan

Niall O'SullivanInternationally acclaimed cross-genre trumpeter Niall O’Sullivan has performed all over the world, from orchestral playing to his solo theatre show. Niall has performed in some of the world’s most stunning venues throughout Ireland, Europe, Asia and the USA.

Leading his own ensemble, Niall and his fellow musicians continue to dazzle the public and give them a fresh appreciation for the trumpet. Bach to Brecht, Handel to Hammerstien, Purcell to Piazzolla, there is no genre Niall will not tackle.

Niall and his wife, vocalist Shóna, have toured extensively in the USA with their hit show ‘My Funny Valentine’ selling out theatres to rave reviews.

Niall has performed live with some of the biggest names in the music business, Perry Como, Dionne Warwick, Curtis Stigers, Imelda May, The Pogues, Lalo Schifrin, Jose Carreras, Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, Sinead O’Connor, Michel Legrand and many more.

His latest album ‘Niall O’Sullivan and Friends’ was produced by Julian Lloyd Webber and Gavin Murphy. It features duets with opera star Danielle de Niese, four time ‘Grammy’ winning jazz guitarist Larry Carlton, theatre royalty Kim Criswell and two of Ireland’s finest vocalists, Emmet Cahill and Lisa Lambe. Accompaniment is provided by the RTÉ Concert Orchestra recently voted the ‘World’s Favourite Orchestra’ by Bachtrack and conductor David Brophy with arrangements by Gavin Murphy.

With a love of opera and the human voice, Niall O’Sullivan tries to emulate this passion when performing.

Niall O'Sullivan playing trumpetWhen the trumpet world got word of his growing profile as a performer and recording artist, Niall became a performing artist for Schilke Trumpets, Chicago exclusively. This relationship has seen Niall represent Schilke across the globe, from Dublin to Los Angeles.
Niall’s self titled debut album and ‘Ballads’ EP reached #1 on the iTunes classical and jazz charts respectively.

As an educator, Niall has given masterclasses and tutored for the National Youth Orchestra of Ireland, Royal Irish Academy of Music and Music Generation Ireland. As an examiner, Niall has enjoyed hearing both grade exams and third level performances for various examination bodies.

Niall started performing at the age of eight in the Artane Boys Band, Dublin. With “the best foundation imaginable” in place, Niall started lessons on scholarship at the DIT Conservatory. He then studied at the Royal Irish Academy of Music for a further four years. Niall was awarded a scholarship for post graduate studies at the Royal College of Music, London.

Niall O’Sullivan is represented by Polaris Artist Management, Vienna.

Niall O’Sullivan is an international performing artist exclusively for Schilke trumpets, Chicago.

Niall O’Sullivan Links

Podcast Credits